Get out and travel

Get out and travel

Every place I’ve ever lived in, from San Diego to NYC, has had an impact on my life and direction, which is pretty typical. I’ve made lifelong friends and have learned what the new racism looks like, which I find valuable, duh. I invite you to read a brief synopsis of my time in some of these cities; a summary of the memories that are fresh on my mind. I was inspired to write this after last weekend in Atlanta someone asked, “What do I have to do to be an executive like you?” I answered very easily, “Get out and travel.”

Dear Coach

I was a skinny eighth grader who was new to the game of basketball and new to Chula Vista. I had not played organized anything up until I came to San Diego. My eighth grade basketball team went to a game at the infamous Chula Vista High School. We were playing the Sweetwater Red Devils and the Spartan team was led by Carnell Penn and others who looked like big men to us little eighth graders.

Emotional expression

Emotional expression

Chula Vista High School, early 90’s, your boy was one of the top 50 football players in the state of California and top 100 basketball players in the country. Yes, the entire country. I was invited to a basketball camp that, back then, was called the Nike Superstars Camp, which was a weeklong intense basketball camp that only the top ballers in the state and country got invited to and your boy was invited. I got the invite in the mail and stuck it in my bag.

Oh Jay

Are we so jaded that when someone is showing us who they unapologetically are we immediately judge them? I think so many of us walk that fine line of disconnecting and staying connected at all times that assumptions become reality far too frequently. I know I have.

Miles logged

Miles logged

I picked them up at the airport and started on our day full of introductory meetings. It was an interesting sight, me, 6’4 and Bill (with his cane), 6’6 or taller. The others were not as assuming as we were (and Brett had a short man’s complex). We went to Starkey, one of the world's largest hearing aid companies and headquartered in Minnesota, and US Bank before lunch. For lunch we had a closed meeting between the four of us. The bread and water came and the conversation started. Brett leaned over during one of his monologues and said, “You know,

Terminal D

I had the fortune of meeting with someone last weekend who encouraged me to write about the real challenges of starting a business in the media/entertainment industry. Let me rephrase that, starting a game changing, impactful, and global business that will bridge and connect the African diaspora around content that is relatable. No small feat to say the least. So for this post, I would like to share some of my personal travel stories and real challenges that may shed light on what entrepreneurship is really like. 

No smiling allowed

No smiling allowed

I was hired by the International Children's Heart Foundation, a global organization focused on operating on children with congenital heart disease around the world, as their President and CEO back in 2009. My immediate assignments were to fix, reorganize, and to build strategic relationships with organizations and governments around the world that would power the organization into the future. Dr. William Novick (one of the three men that I had great respect for, more to come on that in the coming weeks) and the board of directors had hired me.

It's complicated

It's complicated

The incredible importance behind this is that today content or media is an integral part of our world. If we as African Americans, Afro-Europeans, Afro-Caribbeans or Africans see ourselves on a medium that we hold at such high regards, it has tremendous effects on how we look at ourselves in the world, our brain development, and potentially our outcomes.

I fell in love with Kea

I fell in love with Kea

I was a sophomore in college in San Diego with my birthday and the Christmas holidays just around the corner in December. My family had already moved back to South Florida from San Diego to be closer to family.  Since I was already launched in college they thought it was the best time to move. We'd all enjoyed California, it gave us kids great opportunities and showed us a very different life.

No shortcuts

No shortcuts

It was November 22, 2012, the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, and I was on top of the world, heading to the airport to catch a first class Delta flight back to Minneapolis after a business trip in Atlanta. I’d gone to ATL to meet with some investors interested in my new software company, Catena Inc., which was going to revolutionize the way refrigerated cargo was tracked and monitored while in transit.